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How to Describe the Internet of Things to Your Family Over the Holidays

The Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to generate up to $11.1 trillion annually in value by 2025. The potential of the market is incredible, yet many people don’t know what IoT is or means. As families everywhere gather around the dinner table this holiday, they’ll bond with relatives and have a great opportunity to talk about the jobs they love.

The technical aspects of IoT are complex, so when beloved family members ask how things are going at work, it’s not always clear where to begin. We aimed to find out by asking members of our IoT team how they explain their jobs around the holiday dinner table.


dom-merritt
“Embedded computers are in everything now—from your microwave to your car to the factories that built them. The next step is to make those things talk to each other and work together to help you. We make that happen. Along the way, we collect data about patterns in what’s happening, and we use that to predict what will happen in the future.” – Mark Hubbard


dom-merritt
“IoT is embedding intelligence in industrial machines allowing them to be more efficient, self-correcting, safer, and connected, relieving mundane tasks from operators enabling them to focus on the system. In fact, the world needs to produce 70 percent more food in 2050 than it did in 2006 to feed the growing population of Earth. IoT will get us there.” – Danny Salzman


dom-merritt
“IoT is simply connecting embedded computers to the internet. It’s giving every device, every ‘thing’ in the world its own smartphone and its own Facebook feed, so it can tell the world what it is up to and listen to the relevant parts of what the world is up to. 

Once that has been accomplished, now we get all these connected, aware, intelligent devices communicating and processing data, and now we get amazing results. Suddenly, we can create emergent behaviors, hive intelligence, we can mechanically mimic schools of fish, murmurations of starlings, or the fantastic productivity of ants or bees. We don’t even need full blown artificial intelligence or intelligent machines. We merely need rules combined with coordination and awareness.” – Brett Heliker

Interested in learning more about IoT? Check out this post.